Carbon Cycles and Sinks

Allan Savory: How to green the world’s deserts and reverse climate change

In 2009, Allan Savory of the Savory Institute was invited to Dublin to give the Feasta Annual Lecture. His work on transforming the way livestock is managed in order to reverse degradation of arid landscapes was seen as an essential tool in reversing climate change and desertification, and was included in the work of the Carbon Cycles and Sinks Network. The recording of his fascinating full presentation was put online, as well as a few extracts, in which he explains the details of the Holistic Management system.

Contributors to Fleeing Vesuvius

Biographical information about the 27 contributors to Fleeing Vesuvius.

Patrick Andrews qualified as a solicitor in 1988 and spent many years working in the UK and abroad for large corporations, specialising in cross-border transactions. In 2002 he left the corporate world, driven by a concern about its impact on society and the planet. He now teaches and writes about alternatives to conventional ownership and governance structures, and works with business leaders devising new ways of organising. He helped develop a radical financial and governance structure for Riversimple LLP. He lives in the New Forest in England with his wife …

2010 Feasta Climate Group Meeting

The annual Climate Group meeting was held near the Findhorn Community in Scotland. We started with our usual public meeting on the evening of Thursday 25th February and broke up at lunchtime on Sunday, February 28th, in time for most people to travel home and be at work the following day. We had sole use of Newbold House, which was built as a hotel and is now a retreat centre, during our stay. See www.newboldhouse.org.

Corinna Byrne – Carbon Cycles and Sinks; refocussing the purpose and use of land

Corinna Byrne examined the policies needed to get Irish land to absorb CO2 rather than release it. Besides discussing how the large amounts of carbon locked up in peatlands can be safeguarded, she reviewed the role that biochar could play in reducing nitrous oxide and methane emissions and building up the fertility and carbon content of the soil.