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Conspiracies, theories of conspiracy theories and the limits to growth (part 3)

Part Three

Conspiracies at the limits to growth

Part 1
Part 2

In an article on his website, economist Tim Watkins suggests a reason why governments nowadays make so many mistakes that people can come to believe that these mistakes are deliberate – for example, believing that sending elderly people with covid 19 back to care homes was so as to kill off other old people to reduce the pensions bill….In his view it is because governments are more incompetent than they were in the past…

“Central to the neo-liberal project was the belief that governments should play no role

Conclusion

This is the conclusion of the input into the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment’s Waste Advisory Group consultation process on the circular economy by Feasta member Féidhlim Harty.

In the earlier meetings I was conscious of carrying a certain amount of frustration into the meetings, the result of many submissions to government departments in the past with no apparent impact on policy. However as the process continued I began to enjoy the process more and relax a little into it. Whether this was due to greater familiarity with the participants, a sense that things are actually changing a …

8 – Waste Actions in a Circular Economy

This is the Part 8 of the input into the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment’s Waste Advisory Group consultation process on the circular economy by Feasta member Féidhlim Harty.

Following are my responses to the questions raised by the department for consideration as part of the final meeting:

What are the top 3 waste management policy initiatives required to support a transition to a Circular Economy in Ireland?

The policy initiatives needed to achieve a circular economy are not related to waste management. They cannot be. There cannot be both waste and a circular economy. That said there …

7 – Construction and Demolition Waste

This is Part 7 of the input into the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment’s Waste Advisory Group consultation process on the circular economy by Feasta member Féidhlim Harty.

Rather than sticking with the typical Q&A process I approached this issue as an article from the outset, and contributed the following as a response to the Department:

As with all waste streams, the place to look first is not at the full skip outside a typical construction site and wonder where to dump it, or how best to recover the few recyclables that are present and downgrade the concrete …

6 – Enforcement

This is Part 6 of the input into the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment’s Waste Advisory Group consultation process on the circular economy by Feasta member Féidhlim Harty.

Following are my responses to the questions raised by the department for consideration as part of the third meeting:

Are there alternative forms of waste regulation/enforcement which could be more flexible and effective?

Introduction of Waste Cost at Purchase

The primary reason for illegal dumping is to avoid the cost of proper disposal. The main reason for the rise in illegal waste operations is to profit from the space between …

5 – Food Waste

This is Part 5 of the input into the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment’s Waste Advisory Group consultation process on the circular economy by Feasta member Féidhlim Harty.

These two graphics are a summarised version of the recommendations in Tristram Stuart’s book Waste submitted, along with a verbal contribution outlining the main issues, as part of the Waste Advisory Group process for the fifth meeting.

Note also that not all food waste has an equal carbon footprint and waste footprint. My own book Towards Zero Waste focuses a lot on food simply because of the amount of waste …