Submissions

Submission to the UK All-Party Committee on Climate Change

“Is a cross-party consensus on climate change possible – or desirable?”

A cross-party consensus on climate change is possible provided the parties agree to work from the same point of departure. A consensus is also highly desirable because of the radical steps that will have to be taken to respond adequately to the seriousness of the problem.

The text of this submission is included below, or download a PDF Version.…

Submission to Sir Nicholas Stern: Eliminating the Need for Economic Growth

In October, the British Government announced that Sir Nicholas Stern, the head of its Economic Service, had also been appointed its Adviser on the economics of “climate change and development”. Sir Nicholas immediately asked for submissions on, amongst other things, “The implications for energy demand and emissions of the prospects for economic growth over the coming decades.” These submissions had to be in by December 9th. Feasta’s submission sets out many of Feasta’s ideas about why rich-country growth needs to be stopped and how this can be done.

The full text of the submission is included below, or download a …

Response to ‘Sustainable Rural Housing; Consultation Draft of Guidelines for Planning Authorities’

May 2004

This submission critiques the current Irish Rural Housing Guidelines, arguing that their formation lacked proper participation and consultation; they are based on insufficient information; they over-emphasise dispersed housing to the detriment of other types of housing, in particular that of small settlements and villages; they fail to acknowledge important environmental and social factors such as peak oil and the fact that dispersed housing is more likely to be built and inhabited by the relatively well-off; and they introduce a discriminatory planning system based on the provenance and circumstances of the applicant. It suggests that a Rural Housing Commission …

FEASTA submission on Irish Renewable Energy Policy

Contribution to Consultation Process on Policy Goals – March 2004
Ireland’s renewable energy policy can only be developed intelligently if carried out within the framework of an overall energy policy. The latter, in turn, should only be shaped by people who have carefully examined the prospects for energy supplies from conventional sources for the next fifty years. (No shorter period can sensibly be taken in view of the fact that energy-using structures such as buildings, railways and roads built now will have a life of around that period and in some cases far beyond it. Some power infrastructure can also …