Cap and Share

Cap and Share is a way of eliminating fossil fuel production, an alternative to ‘carbon rations’ or carbon taxes. It has two basic premises: firstly, that to stop runaway climate change, we need to cap, or limit, our carbon emissions, and secondly, that the huge amounts of money involved should be shared equally by the population.

Cap and Share has its own dedicated website here. A sister website for the CapGlobalCarbon initiative, which places Cap and Share in a global context, is at www.capglobalcarbon.org.

Cap and Share is the focus of our 2012 publication Sharing for Survival: Restoring the Climate, the Commons and Society, which includes chapters on the commons, policy packages that would be needed alongside Cap and Share, the logistics of managing the share on a global level and how governance could be handled.

Below you’ll find an archive of Feasta blog articles and Feasta submissions that involve Cap and Share.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of the IPCC 1.5 degree report and the Nobel to Nordhaus

"We should celebrate the positives from those news stories in raising general awareness. But for those who recognize the bad and ugly parts of those news stories, we must turn the resulting feeling of powerlessness into a political movement to form a Global Climate Trust and implement Cap Global Carbon," writes Mike Sandler.

First steps towards CapGlobalCarbon: potential partner countries and useful programmes

This is a brief overview of research carried out by CapGlobalCarbon intern Paul Faisant over the summer of 2018, in which he explored the idea of the EU forming a partnership with a group of Asian countries so as to completely eliminate the production and import of fossil fuels on all of their territories, while also reducing poverty and inequality.

Cap and Dividend bill introduced in U.S. Senate – a ray of hope regardless of its “political feasibility”

"For those watching U.S. politics from afar, it may seem like the country is filled with climate deniers and oil drillers. But there was a bright spot recently for those of us in the US who continue to work for climate stability and sanity," writes Mike Sandler.