money

Submission to Sir Nicholas Stern: Eliminating the Need for Economic Growth

In October, the British Government announced that Sir Nicholas Stern, the head of its Economic Service, had also been appointed its Adviser on the economics of “climate change and development”. Sir Nicholas immediately asked for submissions on, amongst other things, “The implications for energy demand and emissions of the prospects for economic growth over the coming decades.” These submissions had to be in by December 9th. Feasta’s submission sets out many of Feasta’s ideas about why rich-country growth needs to be stopped and how this can be done.

The full text of the submission is included below, or download a …

FEASTA course in Belfast

Hosted at the Gibson Institute for Land, Food and Environment, School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast

This was a course designed to explore the root causes of unsustainability: how our society and economy fails to think about and plan for its own long-term health and survival. The course fostered joined-up thinking in considering how to tackle the problems and frame potential solutions.

For instance, what is the link between global climate change, genetically modified foods and rising fuel prices?

The 10 sessions used Feasta’s ‘Community Learning Toolkit’, a CD ROM containing readings, videos and audio recordings that enable a …

The Second Feasta Review

Growth: The Celtic Cancer, Why the global economy damages our health and society

Read this book online in its entirety

A new issue of the Feasta Review was published in November 2004. "The aim of the Review is to present in a permanent form some of the thinking that has been going on in the Feasta network since the previous one appeared" says John Jopling, who edited it with Richard Douthwaite. "It is three years since the last issue and there's a lot to report."

Notes for the UK Sustainable Development Commission, re Redefining Prosperity

By John Jopling for Feasta, October 2003

This submission argues that the Sustainable Development Commission has thus far tended to emphasise symptoms of global problems rather than their root causes. In particular, it argues that the SDC should consider the role played by the global financial system in the world economy, and the link between debt-based money and the pressure on economies to expand indefinitely.

The full text can be found below or downloaded as a PDF version

Land: The Claim of the Community: October 2003 conference

An international conference to explore initiatives in affordable housing, infrastructure provision and local government finance.

9th and 10th October 2003

This event was extremely timely: all levels of Irish government and society are beginning to address the core issues of land ownership, review initiatives abroad and suggest workable mechanisms to deliver social cohesion and sustainable development in Ireland.

Themes
Speakers
About the Organisers
Transcripts of lectures

Themes

The problem in Ireland
Symptoms and causes. The unsustainable costs of home ownership. Homelessness and the pressures on tenants in the private rented sector. Difficulties of acquiring land for social housing. The rural …