Inequality, epidemiology and economics

May 05, 2016 Comments Off on Inequality, epidemiology and economics by
In chapter 13 of his book Credo, Brian Davey points out that public health is an alternative indicator of well-being and is strongly correlated to levels of equality or inequality. Greater equality means greater well-being for everyone and a smaller need for the state – yet inequality has been increasing dramatically.
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Submission to Public Consultation on Development of Strategic Research and Innovation Agendas

Mar 09, 2014 Comments Off on Submission to Public Consultation on Development of Strategic Research and Innovation Agendas by
This submission was made by Feasta on March 6 to the Irish Department of Agriculture regarding "Sustainable Food Production and Processing" and "Food for Health". It describes 10 high level goals that we believe can and should be progressed. It goes on to outline the proposed research that would further these goals, and to explain what the expected results would be and how they could be measured.
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European Health Futures Forum Webinar: Perspectives on Transforming Education and Healthcare

Feb 27, 2014 Comments Off on European Health Futures Forum Webinar: Perspectives on Transforming Education and Healthcare by

Sean Conlan has organised a second webinar on transforming education and healthcare which is open to all by invitation. It will take place on Friday 28 February 2014. If you’re interested please register here. A Youtube video of the event will be available to watch after it takes place. …

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From Our Archives: The Problem with Economic Growth

Feb 05, 2014 Comments Off on From Our Archives: The Problem with Economic Growth by
This article, written by Richard Douthwaite in May 1997, outlines some of the basic ideas that led to the founding of Feasta. It's interesting to note how ahead of his time he was in his criticisms of growth as a measure of progress, many of which are now quite well known. Sadly, the widening inequality he describes and the many problems related to that have only worsened over time.
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The Unacceptable Impacts of Coal Seam Gas and Shale Gas Extraction

Dec 10, 2013 Comments Off on The Unacceptable Impacts of Coal Seam Gas and Shale Gas Extraction by
Brian Davey marshals evidence from the USA and Australia in order to make the case against fracking, an industry with a track record of alienating communities and doing a great deal of environmental damage.
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The nitrogen cycle and health

Apr 02, 2012 Comments Off on The nitrogen cycle and health by
The nitrogen cycle is one of our human life-support systems, supporting human life and life on our planet. Our disruption of the nitrogen cycle is a public health issue of profound importance.
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Growing Together: An all-Ireland conference on Community Supported Agriculture

Jan 25, 2012 Comments Off on Growing Together: An all-Ireland conference on Community Supported Agriculture by
Date: 17th, 18th & 19th of February, Cloughjordan, Tipperary. The aim of this weekend conference is to introduce the CSA concept to communities and growers on the island of Ireland. The event will bring together food producers and emerging Irish CSA’s while creating networking and learning opportunities with experienced initiatives from across Europe.
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Winter vitamins

Jan 25, 2012 1 Comment
by Brian Kallor. We in the modern West have grown up surrounded by mountains of food – grown, picked, processed, preserved, cooked and refrigerated for us, and in such quantities that a third of it is through away uneaten, and obesity presents a major health crisis. Fossil fuels made this brief state possible, and now that we see their end on the horizon we must reacquaint ourselves with the more basic methods of getting nutrition -- ideally allowing more of us, not just to survive, but to eat well.
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Towards resilience: how are mental health professionals to respond to the climate crisis and the threat of ecosystemic collapse?

Jan 17, 2012 Comments Off on Towards resilience: how are mental health professionals to respond to the climate crisis and the threat of ecosystemic collapse?
A symposium at the 2nd annual Irish Council for Psychotherapy conference. Presented by Feasta member John Sharry, with Phil Kearney and Aebhin Cawley. Conference date: January 26-27 2012 Venue: Dublin Castle
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Your community in a currency crisis

Dec 18, 2011 4 Comments
In a follow-up to her earlier post on preparing your household for a currency crisis, Theresa Carter suggests a range of practical preparations that communities can make in order to build resilience.
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How I survived the end of the world in Aotearoa

Dec 12, 2011 Comments Off on How I survived the end of the world in Aotearoa
In his chapter from the New Zealand edition of Fleeing Vesuvius, Laurence Boomert gives an account of a lifetime built on accepting and rejecting Vesuvius and the progressive actions taken to beat the odds. "The foreground will seem like the end of the world but I see, through the smoke and ruins of that which must fall, a wiser, more humble, more determined humanity with 10,000 years of social and technological success stories to draw on, setting a new course for the future."
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Economics is not a social science

Oct 05, 2011 8 Comments
In this article Brian Davey explains the rationale for setting up a group called "Cafe Economique" in Nottingham. Following a similar group in Leeds a Nottingham group has been set up, one of whose aims is to give non-economists the confidence to participate in economic discussions. It is high time that non-economists feel able to challenge the baloney that most economists preach and are armed with the ideas that will allow them to do so. In this piece, Brian attacks the status claim that economics makes when it describes itself as a "social science".
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Busy doing nothing – seven reasons for humanity’s inertia in the face of critical threats and how we might remove them

Sep 16, 2011 Comments Off on Busy doing nothing – seven reasons for humanity’s inertia in the face of critical threats and how we might remove them
from Fleeing Vesuvius, by Mark Rutledge and Brian Davey. Seven reasons why humans have failed to curb their excessive resource consumption are outlined here, some of which are systemic, others the result of the way humanity evolved. Our best chance of counteracting them will come when the crisis pushes us out of our comfortable ruts.
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