Emer O’Siochru

Sustainable Residential Developments in Urban Areas

Response to Irish Department of the Environment, Heritage & Local Government Consultation Call Feb 2008:

by Emer Ó Siochrú

In general, we welcome these Guidelines and Urban Design Manual as they comprise a good outline of current best practice, an improvement on the current situation. But we fear that the Guidelines are too late; they address an economic reality that is rapidly changing; they largely ignore pressures in rural areas and they are not ambitious enough to properly address the energy, climate and social challenges currently facing Ireland.

PDF Version (175 K)

Public Meeting: How thinking about the climate crisis needs to change

Chaired by Emer O Siochru of Cap-and-Share Ireland

Speakers:

The problems

David Wasdell of the Meridian Programme

The pace at which climate change is already taking place has not been taken into account by politicians, policymakers and even the UN. Many feedback mechanisms have been ignored.

Richard Douthwaite of Feasta

Peak oil and climate change both mean that the use of fossil fuels has to be rationed in some way. Unless this is done, the income gap between those who can afford to use energy and those who can’t will widen considerably. Millions will starve.

The solutions

Peter Barnes of …

Joined Up Thinking and Sustainability

Two Feasta Courses

The Cultivate Centre for Sustainable Living and Learning hosted two FEASTA courses in autumn 2006. Cultivate is located in Temple Bar (address below) and bookings can be made at Cultivate 01 6745773

The Economic Challenge of Sustainability

This paper, which was written for CORI Justice, gives an overview of Feasta’s ideas about economic growth, money systems, peak oil, and the need for a land value tax and for citizen carbon quotas.

by Richard Douthwaite and Emer Ó Siochrú

The full document is included below, or download a PDF version.

The ENLIVEN report

The ENLIVEN ReportEnergy Networks Linking Innovation in Villages in Europe Now

The ENLIVEN project is a cross sector partnership led by Irish Rural Link. Partners are: Offaly County Council; Feasta, the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability; Dundalk Institute of Technology; Methanogen; EOS Architects; Martin Langton, Developer; Pauric Davis and Associates, Engineers; Michael Layden, Community Energy Consultant; Sean Riordan, Developer.

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Executive Summary

Historically, communities developed in places where resources were available. Today however, many rural communities are in decline because the use of fossil fuels has devalued their renewable energy sources, made the growing of many non-food crops irrelevant, and exposed their food products to price competition from places where land is more abundant.

This project is based on the premise that the tide may be about to turn. Restrictions on the use of fossil fuel in response to the threat of climate change and because of oil and gas depletion are about to make energy supplies scarcer and more costly. Handled correctly, this could create the circumstances in which rural communities will again be able to grow by developing their local resources, particularly those of energy.

Food security in an energy-scarce world: Conference Programme

PROGRAMME SUMMARY

Opening Lecture at the Davenport Hotel, Dublin (19:30 Wednesday, June 22nd)

An evening lecture by Richard Heinberg introduced ‘Peak Oil’ and the potential effects on societies, on economies and on the world’s food supply. This lecture was introduced by Richard Douthwaite and is open to a wider audience.

Three Day Conference at the Faculty of Agri-Food and the Environment, UCD

Session 1: Food Under Threat (Thursday Morning, June 23rd)

Session 2: Examining Our Food Supply Systems (Thursday Afternoon, June 23rd)

Session 3: Possible Solutions 1 (Friday Morning, June 24th)

Session 4: Possible Solutions 2 (Friday Afternoon, June 24th) …