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education

Significant discrepancies between Irish peoples’ overall well-being and Irish GDP levels during the period 2000-2014, according to new study published by Feasta and FEST

A newly-developed National Well-being Index finds that well-being in Ireland flatlined and even diminished slightly during peak GDP years 2001-2004. The index takes housework, voluntary work, healthcare, education and environmental damage into account.

Help support environmental education in Cameroon

Long-time Feasta member Mike Thomas has launched a Crowdfunding project to establish environmental education programmes in 5 schools in the northwest region of Cameroon. Children will learn organic farming techniques and the schools will also be able to earn an income. Mike would be very pleased if you could find time to look at his striking campaign website. Even if you feel unable to support the project he would welcome your comments and any suggestions for improvement. He would also be very grateful if you could distribute the project on your own social network.…

European Health Future Forum webinar: the transformations of self care and self learning

Feasta trustee Séan Conlan is the EHFF Director for external relations and has helped to organise this webinar. It’s the first in a series whose objective is to explore the current and future transformation of education and healthcare. It is based on conversations by practitioners who are exploring new approaches in their own domains. It is hoped that the Webinars will encourage an emerging cross-fertilised community.

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Occupy Education: Two reviews

In her review of Tina Evans' new book Occupy Education, Anne Ryan writes that it is"part of a lineage that seeks to repair the conceptual rift between humans and nature which exists in western society". The book explores the role that a well-developed pedagogy of sustainability could play in the quest for solutions to our ecological and social challenges. There's a strong emphasis on practical action such as localised food production. Ryan's full review can be read here, along with that of Mark Garavan who believes the book to be "an important contribution to the task of transforming our world."

Growing people not economies

In this article I argue that theories are often used as justification to push people around and to bully them - particularly economic theories. If the future is one where we "grow people" rather than "growing economies" we need very different kinds of arrangements and skills - and we should start in our own movement.