carbon

Lessons learnt from the not-so-radical Tyndall emissions conference

Several Feasta climate group members attended the Tyndall Radical Emissions Reduction conference in December 2013. Three of them - Nick Bardsley, Brian Davey and Laurence Matthews - have shared their reactions to the way the conference was organised. You can also download posters that were displayed at the conference by John Jopling, Nick Bardsley and Brian Davey.

Nick Bardsley’s reflections on the Tyndall Centre “Radical Emissions Reduction” conference

I was in two minds whether to attend this conference or not. In common with the other members of the FEASTA Climate group that had submitted paper proposals, mine was rejected. Though I was allocated a poster presentation this is usually not a great use of one’s time. In the end I decided that this was probably sour grapes on my part and that it would be good to attend to meet other like minded people, if nothing else.

If I had mixed feelings beforehand, they were more mixed afterwards. It was a good way of meeting people, and although …

Posters available for the Occupy movement

Feasta member Brian Davey has produced several posters for use at Occupy camps which can be downloaded for free here. They make use of creative graphics in order to explore the nature of the current financial crisis, the energy and banking crises, financial predation, and the connection between the Occupy movements and climate change.

Turning the land from an emissions source to a carbon sink

By Corinna Byrne, from Fleeing Vesuvius. Farming and other land-based activities could do a lot to mitigate global warming. Ireland needs new policies to get its land to absorb CO2 rather than release it. The large amounts of carbon locked up in the country’s peatlands must be safeguarded and damaged bogs restored so that they can sequester carbon again. In addition, the use of biochar could reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions and build up the fertility and carbon content of the soil.

Building a greenhouse gas emissions reduction and sinks development programme into the CAP

This submission was made by the Carbon Cycles and Sinks Network. It describes a possible framework for a Rural Environmental Protection-type framework which would reward farmers for practices that were likely to lead to their reducing their GHG emissions and also increasing the carbon content of their soils and the biomass growing on them. It suggests that best farming practice is re-assessed in the light of its climate effects and sequestration potential and re-defined if necessary. Farm payments would be made conditional on the adoption of these new best practice standards. No attempt would be made to pay farmers for …