Submission to Sir Nicholas Stern: Eliminating the Need for Economic Growth

Dec 09, 2005 Comments Off

In October, the British Government announced that Sir Nicholas Stern, the head of its Economic Service, had also been appointed its Adviser on the economics of “climate change and development”. Sir Nicholas immediately asked for submissions on, amongst other things, “The implications for energy demand and emissions of the prospects for economic growth over the coming decades.” These submissions had to be in by December 9th. Feasta’s submission sets out many of Feasta’s ideas about why rich-country growth needs to be stopped and how this can be done.

The full text of the submission is included below, or download a …

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Radical overhaul of emissions allocation required

Nov 28, 2005 Comments Off

An opinion piece by Feasta’s Richard Douthwaite was recently published in the Irish Timeson November 28 2005. “As the Montreal conference on global warming opens, we cannot hope for progress on climate change unless the approach to negotiations is drastically revised.” …

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Reforming the EU Emissions Trading Scheme in the light of experience during the pilot phase

Nov 23, 2005 Comments Off

In this submission to the Irish Department of the Environment Feasta suggests that Ireland should adopt an energy rationing system to help the country meet its Kyoto emissions target.

The full text of the submission is included below, or download a PDF Version.…

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South Africa and the Oil Price Crisis

Oct 14, 2005 Comments Off

Although oil prices are already causing extreme hardship to the poor in many African countries they are likely to go higher still. South Africa could use its prestige and power to work with its neighbours to prevent living standards getting even worse.

This document was printed for distribution at the energy conference in South Africa.
The full text of the document is included below, or download the PDF version.

According to the World Bank, higher energy prices can hit the poor twice as hard as those in the highest income group.1 A study in Yemen found that a $15 …

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The ENLIVEN report

Oct 08, 2005 Comments Off

The ENLIVEN ReportEnergy Networks Linking Innovation in Villages in Europe Now

The ENLIVEN project is a cross sector partnership led by Irish Rural Link. Partners are: Offaly County Council; Feasta, the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability; Dundalk Institute of Technology; Methanogen; EOS Architects; Martin Langton, Developer; Pauric Davis and Associates, Engineers; Michael Layden, Community Energy Consultant; Sean Riordan, Developer.

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Executive Summary

Historically, communities developed in places where resources were available. Today however, many rural communities are in decline because the use of fossil fuels has devalued their renewable energy sources, made the growing of many non-food crops irrelevant, and exposed their food products to price competition from places where land is more abundant.

This project is based on the premise that the tide may be about to turn. Restrictions on the use of fossil fuel in response to the threat of climate change and because of oil and gas depletion are about to make energy supplies scarcer and more costly. Handled correctly, this could create the circumstances in which rural communities will again be able to grow by developing their local resources, particularly those of energy.

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Letter on the Irish Nationwide Building Society

Nov 25, 2004 Comments Off

Posted to Irish TDS and Senators

25th November, 2004

Dear Deputy,

The Irish Nationwide Building Society

Ireland has only two mutual building societies left – the EBS and the Irish Nationwide – and for at least ten years, Michael Fingleton of the Nationwide has made it clear that he intends that his society should follow the example of the Irish Permanent and the First National and shed its mutual status. The Department of the Environment will be putting a bill before Dail within the next few weeks which, among other things, is intended to allow the INBS to do so. …

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The Second Feasta Review

Nov 13, 2004 Comments Off

The Celtic CancerGrowth: The Celtic Cancer, Why the global economy damages our health and society

Read this book online in its entirety

A new issue of the Feasta Review was published in November 2004. "The aim of the Review is to present in a permanent form some of the thinking that has been going on in the Feasta network since the previous one appeared" says John Jopling, who edited it with Richard Douthwaite. "It is three years since the last issue and there's a lot to report."

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Review of the Second Feasta Review by James Robertson

Nov 12, 2004 Comments Off

from James Robertson’s December 2004 newsletter.

This fine collection of high-quality items (207 double-column pages), edited by Richard Douthwaite and John Jopling, and published in November 2004 by the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability in Dublin, is something special. […] It can be read online at www.feasta.org/documents/review2/index.htm.

On that page, there’s also an option to order it for £9.95 from Green Books.

Unlike Feasta Review No.1 (2001), this one has a title – “GROWTH: THE CELTIC CANCER: Why the global economy damages our health and society”. But potential readers should not be misled into supposing the Review …

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Land Value Tax: Unfinished Business

Nov 09, 2004 Comments Off

Emer Ó Siochrú

This paper is reprinted, with permission, from the book A Fairer Tax System For A Fairer Ireland, published by the CORI Justice Commission. The book also contains papers by Tom Dunne and Richard Douthwaite. It can be downloaded in its entirety from the CORI website, in PDF format, at http://www.cori.ie/justice/publications/papers/A_Fairer_Tax_System.pdf.

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Taming the Tiger

Nov 08, 2004 Comments Off

PDF version

Introduction to the Second Feasta Review by John Jopling

Why the growth tiger is unsustainable and what can be done about it.

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Feasta Money Group to fight change in Building Society law

Jun 11, 2004 Comments Off

Ireland has only two mutual building societies left – the EBS and the Irish Nationwide – and for at least ten years, Michael Fingleton of the Nationwide has made it clear that he intends that it should follow the example of the Irish Permanent and the First National and shed its mutual status. The Feasta Money Group intends to try to prevent it doing so. Here’s why.…

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To Catch the Wind: The Potential for Community Ownership of Wind Farms in Ireland

Jun 03, 2004 Comments Off

To Catch The Wind

Download the entire document as one PDF file (5 MB)

A publication of the Renewable Energy Partnership, June 2004
Ireland has one of the most promising, untapped energy resources to be found anywhere in Europe – wind energy. It is one of the few sectors in which the West of Ireland in particular has a major competitive advantage over almost every other region in Europe.

It was for this reason that, early in 2002, the Renewable Energy Partnership (REP), which consists of Brí Nua Community Wind Energy Group, Mayo Community Wind Energy Group and the Western Development Commission (WDC), began …

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Response to ‘Sustainable Rural Housing; Consultation Draft of Guidelines for Planning Authorities’

May 04, 2004 Comments Off

May 2004

This submission critiques the current Irish Rural Housing Guidelines, arguing that their formation lacked proper participation and consultation; they are based on insufficient information; they over-emphasise dispersed housing to the detriment of other types of housing, in particular that of small settlements and villages; they fail to acknowledge important environmental and social factors such as peak oil and the fact that dispersed housing is more likely to be built and inhabited by the relatively well-off; and they introduce a discriminatory planning system based on the provenance and circumstances of the applicant. It suggests that a Rural Housing Commission

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