Marginal productivity theory

Sep 21, 2016 Comments Off on Marginal productivity theory
This chapter of Credo, by Brian Davey, describes the “marginal revolution” of neoclassical economics. The idea of marginal productivity and payments to “factors of production” was developed for ideological reasons to counter thinkers like Marx and George. The theoretical framework learned by generations of students is contradicted by the evidence. The ideas of capital and land in neoclassical economics are incoherent.
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Who are the parasites? The radical implications of classical economics

Sep 06, 2016 Comments Off on Who are the parasites? The radical implications of classical economics
In this chapter of Credo, Brian Davey discusses the differences between classical and neoclassical economics, and the implications for taxation and the distribution of power. Those following the current controversy over taxation in Ireland should find his argument interesting.
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Ecocide for climate safety: Setting up a system to Keep It In The Ground

Aug 30, 2016 Comments Off on Ecocide for climate safety: Setting up a system to Keep It In The Ground
Erik-Jan Van Oosten discusses the relationship between CapGlobalCarbon and ecocide law: "A global law against ecocide and a global cap on fossil carbon extraction seem to me the two key, mutually reinforcing, conditions for a sustainable society."
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Fantasies of “Socialism with an iPad”?: Inventing the Future by Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams: Review

Aug 14, 2016 Comments Off on Fantasies of “Socialism with an iPad”?: Inventing the Future by Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams: Review
"Sometimes you read a book that helps to crystalize your thinking, not because you agree with it, but because you don't" writes Brian Davey, who goes on to challenge the authors' assumptions about the availability of renewable energy and the nature and potential of localism.
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The centrality of externalities to economic thinking

Jul 31, 2016 Comments Off on The centrality of externalities to economic thinking
Brian Davey argues in Credo that what economists call “externalities” are not unusual or a special case, they are ubiquitous. They are rooted in private property and the relationships of market society. The way in which non market societies protect bio-diversity through totem arrangements is described.
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The “regulation” of unconventional gas

Jul 22, 2016 Comments Off on The “regulation” of unconventional gas
This presentation by Brian Davey, made in July 2016 on behalf of Frack Free Notts, outlines the problems with the regulatory structure for unconventional gasfield development in the UK. It discusses the problem of “regulatory capture” by the industry, deceptive PR, the selective recognition of ‘experts’ and siloing of different aspects of safety (such as the environment and health).
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Designing an Intentional Currency

Jul 13, 2016 Comments Off on Designing an Intentional Currency
An epistle from an imaginary adviser to an imaginary startup currency. Time to get off the proverbial fence. With a health warning. By Graham Barnes.
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Economics in Darwinist mode – the competitive struggle for existence

Jun 30, 2016 Comments Off on Economics in Darwinist mode – the competitive struggle for existence
Improved competitiveness is a major goal of virtually every nation and trading bloc in the world. Both sides in the Brexit debate claimed that Britain would become more competitive if they prevailed. But where does this glorification of competition come from? Does it reflect fundamentals of human nature, or does it stem from a quasi-religious dogma that goes largely unquestioned? Brian Davey explores the roots of the obsession with competitiveness, and its knock-on effects, in a chapter of his book Credo.
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Jim Ratcliffe, Ineos and the empire of trash

Jun 11, 2016 3 Comments
Brian Davey explores the decision of Ineos, one of the world's largest chemical companies, to promote fracking. The Ineos majority shareholder, Jim Ratcliffe, claims fracking could regenerate northern Britain despite evidence that the strategy is "a mirage that would lead to a mountain of debt and a mountain of garbage".
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Tackling climate, poverty and inequality together: managing the share in CapGlobalCarbon on a global level

Jun 05, 2016 Comments Off on Tackling climate, poverty and inequality together: managing the share in CapGlobalCarbon on a global level
Caroline Whyte draws on development theory, recent technological developments and research on inequality to argue that the share in CapGlobalCarbon could and should be distributed to individuals globally. The impact on poverty and inequality worldwide could be massive.
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Consumerism, Collective Psychopathology, Waste

May 29, 2016 Comments Off on Consumerism, Collective Psychopathology, Waste
This chapter of Credo by Brian Davey discusses conspicuous consumption and the consumer society, branding and the manufacture of wants. The role of advertisers is explored as well as the way that attention grabbing has become an economic sector that affects the quality of life radically and for the worse.
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CapGlobalCarbon, Keep It In The Ground and the divestment campaign

May 20, 2016 Comments Off on CapGlobalCarbon, Keep It In The Ground and the divestment campaign
Caroline Whyte argues that while the Keep it in the Ground and divestment campaigns both have the potential to achieve significant progress on climate change, they need structural support in order to ensure that their actions actually have teeth. This support could be provided by CapGlobalCarbon.
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Labelling as a stepping stone to zero fossil fuels

May 14, 2016 Comments Off on Labelling as a stepping stone to zero fossil fuels
Caroline Whyte describes a possible way to ease the transition to 100% renewables: labelling of fuel that is produced by companies who have signed up to CapGlobalCarbon, undertaking to completely eliminate their fossil fuel production by 2050 at the latest.
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