About Brian Davey

Brian Davey graduated from the Nottingham University Department of Economics and, aside from a brief spell working in eastern Germany showing how to do community development work, has spent most of his life working in the community and voluntary sector in Nottingham particularly in health promotion, mental health and environmental fields. He helped form Ecoworks, a community garden and environmental project for people with mental health problems. He is a member of Feasta Climate Working Group and former co-ordinator of the Cap and Share Campaign. He is editor of the Feasta book Sharing for Survival: Restoring the Climate, the Commons and Society, and the author of Credo: Economic Beliefs in a World in Crisis.

Brian Davey has written 92 articles so far, you can find them below.

Earth, Air, Fire and Water: Evolving Global Commoning

This short presentation was prepared by Brian Davey for a side event at the recent "Economics and the Commons" conference held in Berlin. It provides practical suggestions for the formation of a global commons partnership of participants and practitioners in existing commons, in order to help defend them and to develop new commons-based projects.

Degrowth in a small peripheral European state

Could a small peripheral state be a pioneer for adapting to degrowth? Brian Davey comments on two articles on the economy of Croatia that were recently published by the Green European Journal. The first article by Igor Matutinovic calls for green growth while the second, by the left-green Group 22, argues that we need to move away from the growth-based economic paradigm. Brian reflects on the two sides' arguments and suggests policies to help promote a paradigm shift in the Croatian economy.

Report from the McPlanet conference

Broken promises and naive expectations - that's how many people at the McPlanet Conference held recently in Berlin clearly felt about the last two decades of global environmental policy. They believe that an imperfect-but-better alternative exists: protecting and enhancing the commons and community-based protection of biological resources worldwide, including in regions such as sub-Saharan Africa where land-grabbing is currently rife.