Unconventional gas field development and optimism bias: submission by Brian Davey to the UK Environment Agency

Mar 29, 2016 Comments Off on Unconventional gas field development and optimism bias: submission by Brian Davey to the UK Environment Agency by

Brian Davey recently made a submission on fracking to the UK Environment Agency, in response to the UK-based company IGas’s application to drill two wells in North Nottinghamshire as part of its shale gas exploration efforts. You can access the documents which Brian is responding to here.

In his submission, Brian stresses that there is a need for both anticipatory and retrospective experience-based risk assessments, and also argues that there are specific risks in this case that need to be addressed. In conclusion, he writes, “there are now over 550+ peer reviewed academic studies relating unconventional gas field development to public health and the environment – there is an ethical and scientific obligation to connect risk assessment and risk management in order to make it consistent with the findings of this literature.”

Read the submission

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About the author

Brian Davey trained as an economist but, aside from a brief spell working in eastern Germany showing how to do community development work, has spent most of his life working in the community and voluntary sector in Nottingham particularly in health promotion, mental health and environmental fields. He helped form Ecoworks, a community garden and environmental project for people with mental health problems. He is a member of Feasta Climate Working Group and former co-ordinator of the Cap and Share Campaign. He is editor of the Feasta book Sharing for Survival: Restoring the Climate, the Commons and Society, and the author of Credo: Economic Beliefs in a World in Crisis.

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