Prejudice, Ignorance and Granfalloons – Society in the Trump Era

Nov 24, 2016 No Comments by
Energetic and ecological limits are mostly unknown because they are taboos. It would be great if people found out more about these limits because responding to them seems to me to be the most pressing of all agendas for society. What is more likely however is that the bulk of the population will now pre-occupy themselves with granfalloons instead – and plenty of very educated people will help them. By Brian Davey.
Commentary Read more

Living in Unpredictable Times

Nov 20, 2016 Comments Off on Living in Unpredictable Times by
Brian Davey argues that in many aspects of life one can turn a story upside down or reverse cause and effect and it will still be plausible. Moreover, things that don't fit into the prevailing narrative are often downplayed or ignored. The coming bankruptcy of the energy sector is a crisis that mainstream economists will not be able to understand nor to solve. The faith that there will always be a techno fix and that continued growth is the normal state of affairs is likely to remain pervasive for a longest time - despite growing chaos.
Commentary, Discussion Paper Read more

Creating More Elbow Room

Nov 15, 2016 Comments Off on Creating More Elbow Room by
To mark the fifth anniversary of Feasta co-founder Richard Douthwaite's death, and in light of current world events, we're featuring this chapter from his book Short Circuit, which is perhaps even more relevant today than it was back in 1996. It discusses the pernicious effects of world trade at present and the need to move towards a more human economy, and then describes three new approaches that could be taken.
Short Circuit: Strengthening Local Economies in an Unstable World Read more

A Changing World – Coping in a crisis

Nov 12, 2016 Comments Off on A Changing World – Coping in a crisis by
In an update of her original article from 2011, Theresa O'Donohue provides some practical suggestions for dealing with the turbulent times that may be ahead.
Discussion Paper, News Read more

Georgist Macro-Economics and the Land Value Tax

Oct 15, 2016 Comments Off on Georgist Macro-Economics and the Land Value Tax by
Brian Davey argues in Credo that the ideas of Henry George are still very relevant for economic theory. A site value tax would help to stabilise property market cycles and promote greater spatial efficiency. However, while helpful, market mechanisms like a site value tax will not, on its own, fully resolve the environmental crisis.
Credo, News Read more

The Oracle of Oil: Review

Oct 06, 2016 1 Comment by
M King Hubbert, known as 'the father of peak oil,' was one of the first to question unlimited economic growth. "In his life and career you find the seeds of major environmental, socioeconomic and political challenges which we are still confronted with today, and which still need solving," writes Jacqueline Mathewes in this review of Mason Inman's biography.
Book Reviews Read more

Towards Climate Safety and Justice briefing report

Sep 29, 2016 Comments Off on Towards Climate Safety and Justice briefing report by
This report summarises the outcomes from a two-day event on June 8 and 9 2016 that was organised by Feasta, Cultivate and Trócaire. It provided a briefing on CapGlobalCarbon - a campaign organised by members of Feasta's climate group - set it in the context of the commons, divestment and social justice, and generated ideas about how to implement it as part of a broader citizens' movement for a fair and sustainable transition from fossil fuels.
News Read more

Marginal productivity theory

Sep 21, 2016 Comments Off on Marginal productivity theory
This chapter of Credo, by Brian Davey, describes the “marginal revolution” of neoclassical economics. The idea of marginal productivity and payments to “factors of production” was developed for ideological reasons to counter thinkers like Marx and George. The theoretical framework learned by generations of students is contradicted by the evidence. The ideas of capital and land in neoclassical economics are incoherent.
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Who are the parasites? The radical implications of classical economics

Sep 06, 2016 Comments Off on Who are the parasites? The radical implications of classical economics
In this chapter of Credo, Brian Davey discusses the differences between classical and neoclassical economics, and the implications for taxation and the distribution of power. Those following the current controversy over taxation in Ireland should find his argument interesting.
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Ecocide for climate safety: Setting up a system to Keep It In The Ground

Aug 30, 2016 Comments Off on Ecocide for climate safety: Setting up a system to Keep It In The Ground
Erik-Jan Van Oosten discusses the relationship between CapGlobalCarbon and ecocide law: "A global law against ecocide and a global cap on fossil carbon extraction seem to me the two key, mutually reinforcing, conditions for a sustainable society."
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Fantasies of “Socialism with an iPad”?: Inventing the Future by Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams: Review

Aug 14, 2016 Comments Off on Fantasies of “Socialism with an iPad”?: Inventing the Future by Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams: Review
"Sometimes you read a book that helps to crystalize your thinking, not because you agree with it, but because you don't" writes Brian Davey, who goes on to challenge the authors' assumptions about the availability of renewable energy and the nature and potential of localism.
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The centrality of externalities to economic thinking

Jul 31, 2016 Comments Off on The centrality of externalities to economic thinking
Brian Davey argues in Credo that what economists call “externalities” are not unusual or a special case, they are ubiquitous. They are rooted in private property and the relationships of market society. The way in which non market societies protect bio-diversity through totem arrangements is described.
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The “regulation” of unconventional gas

Jul 22, 2016 Comments Off on The “regulation” of unconventional gas
This presentation by Brian Davey, made in July 2016 on behalf of Frack Free Notts, outlines the problems with the regulatory structure for unconventional gasfield development in the UK. It discusses the problem of “regulatory capture” by the industry, deceptive PR, the selective recognition of ‘experts’ and siloing of different aspects of safety (such as the environment and health).
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